Remember: Experience Counts.

At Great Lakes Eye Institute, our highly skilled, board certified surgeons and support team are renowned leaders in refractive surgery. When you choose Great Lakes Eye Institute rest assured you're choosing - clearly, the best in sight.

Cataracts

Cataracts are one of the most common causes of decreased vision. A cataract can occur at any age although they are most common in adults after the age of 40 and particularly in the elderly. In fact more than half of all Americans age 65 and older have a cataract. Cataracts can also develop from eye injuries, certain diseases, or long-term exposure to sunlight. It is important to your quality of life to have regular eye examinations by the professionals at Great Lakes Eye Institute.

What Is A Cataract?

A cataract is a clouding or blurring of the eyes naturally clear lens. The lens is made mostly of water and protein. As we age, the lens continues to grow layers on its surface and hardens. Protein in the lens can clump together and start to cloud small areas of the lens, preventing light from reaching the retina and interfering with your vision. The cloudiness of the lens is what we call a cataract. Over time, the cataract may grow larger and cloud more of the lens making it more difficult to see. At a certain point, surgery should be considered when vision loss interferes with your daily activities.

What Is The Procedure Like?

At the Great Lakes Eye Institute, highly skilled board certified physicians perform no-stitch, minimally invasive cataract procedures on an outpatient basis. The surgery usually lasts less than 1 hour and is virtually painless. In fact, many people choose to stay awake during the procedure or they may be given a sedative. A local anesthetic will numb the nerves in and around your eye. The skin around your eye will be thoroughly cleansed and sterile covering will be place around your head. You may see light and movement, but you will not be able to see the procedure while it is underway. Once the cloudy lens is removed from the eye, replacing it with a permanent intraocular lens implant restores the focusing power of the natural lens. Options and types of lens implant will be discussed after a complete eye examination, evaluation, and prior to surgery.

After your procedure a protective shield will be placed over your eyes. After a short stay in our recovery area, you will be ready to go home. Most patients can resume normal activities, with the exception of heavy lifting or strenuous work. You'll use prescribed eye drops and be given specific care instructions from your Great Lakes Eye Institute ophthalmologist.